IMPACT VISION

People living with schizophrenia are one of the most marginalized and stigmatized groups in society.

OUR IMPACT VISION is to help end the stigma around schizophrenia, and other severe mental illnesses, so that people at risk can speak up and find recovery. Other marginalized groups have been encouraged to “come out”- those with mental illness need to be empowered to do so as well.

Support Dan and Margot and #EndTheStigma around schizohphrenia. 

 

IMPACT ON YOUR COMMUNITY/ HOST A SCREENING

If you are you interested in hosting a special screening of "Dan and Margot" in your community or for your organization, we'd love to hear from you! Please email us at: info@indiecanent.com.  

DOWNLOAD OUR EDUCATIONAL GUIDE HERE... When hosting your own screening, you can use this toolkit to help lead a discussion!

 

IMPACT TO AUDIENCES

Greater understanding of schizophrenia amongst the public, as well as at home amongst loved ones.... 
“My daughter has schizophrenia and I think it would be healthy for other members of my family to see the movie ‘Dan and Margot’ to give them a better understanding of what she is faced with. I saw the movie at the Victoria Film Festival and it certainly helped me to understand some of the issues my daughter is faced with on a daily basis.”- Anonymous

Encourages young adults and at risk populations to “come out,” get support & find hope....
“I am currently waiting for a mental health assessment to see if I have schizophrenia. I am terrified…  
[Dan and Margot] is amazing! Best film I have watched on Schizophrenia. I love that the film is so human, which made me feel that I am not alone! Margot and all her friends definitely provided me hope!”- Anonymous 

A deeper educational tool, that uses 'contagious empathy,' to help better equip professionals, educators, & students ....
“This should be shown in every school in North America… I got exactly what I came for in terms of a little education/ edutainment about how better to support people within the group who are managing their schizophrenia and wanting to stay well, but I got more than that….”              - Colin Bell, Glasgow

At all of our festival screenings, we surveyed audience members to see how the film informed their own perception of schizophrenia and mental illness. This is what we found:

  • A QUARTER OF OUR AUDIENCES SAID THEY HAVE BEEN OR WOULD BE AFRAID TO MEET SOMEONE LIVING WITH SCHIZOPHRENIA, OR WERE UNCERTAIN AS TO WHETHER THEY WOULD FEEL THIS WAY..... 
  • 83% STATED THE FILM BROADENED THEIR PERCEPTION OF SCHIZOPHRENIA
  • 40% AGREE STIGMA HAS PREVENTED THEM FROM DISCUSSING THEIR OWN MENTAL HEALTH
  • 88% STATED THE FILM ENCOURAGES THEM TO DISCUSS MENTAL HEALTH

Did you see the film? Tell us what you think! Complete the AUDIENCE SURVEY HERE.

 

IMPACT TO ORGS

The film has been graciously supported and/ or co-presented by some exceptional organizations including:

The BC Schizophrenia Society
The Ontario Schizophrenia Society
CAMH
TIFF Reel Comfort Programme

By working with these organizations we have been able to reach our target audience, meaning those who are most likely to be impacted by and engage with the film. This includes: those living with schizophrenia and more generally- mental health issues, their loved ones, as well as health care professionals, students, educators and academics who love to continue to expand their knowledge on lived experience. 

“From tears to laughter, Dan and Margot audiences share Margot’s journey of continual challenges and triumphs. Bringing light to one of the most stigma-laden illnesses, Margot looks to the future, sometimes with hope, sometimes despair, to understand Schizophrenia and her desire to be well. While Margot isn’t always able to make choices that support her recovery, she is always seeking a way to wellness. Margot is not alone; with one in 100 individuals impacted by this brain illness worldwide, Margot’s story is a familiar one. The difference is that Margot has the opportunity and tenacity to share her story with you, and for that, we are thankful. ”                                                                                     -Deborah Conner, British Columbia Schizophrenia Society.